Madrone Wall Timeline:

  • 1937: County purchases 44 acres from private citizen Anna S. Robertson for $2000
  • 1950’s – early 1970’s: Small sporadic County rock quarry for timber road maintenance only (Hardscrabble Quarry)
  • 1970’s – 1997: Site open for outdoor recreational access including rock climbing; rock climbers enhance and protect resource by building hiking trails and collect rubbish at no cost to County
  • 1997: Barton Pit scheduled for closure
  • September 1997: Madrone Wall site closed to all public access by order of Board of County Commissioners
  • 1997 – 1998: Clackamas County conducts a series of expensive studies including Hardrock Quarry Topographic Study, Quarry Water Remediation Survey
  • April 1998: Organizational meeting of the Madrone Wall Preservation Committee
  • November 1998: Board of County Commissioners: “public discussion (has) already occurred“ and “determined that it is in the public’s best interest to continue to use this site as a much needed rock quarry“. Citizens not even informed that site considered for open pit mine quarry.
  • November 1998: MWPC files Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requesting public records documenting County mining plans which County denies and later reverses because of legal pressure and massive documentation of studies released
  • February 1999: MWPC informs Carver-area citizens of County’s intention to mine site and hold meeting at Carver School; citizens are outraged to learn that quarry is planned on Clackamas Bluffs
  • March 1999: MWPC incorporates as a 501 (c)(3) organization for public benefit in State of Oregon
  • June 1999: MWPC funds plant and animal study through Portland State University documenting over 100 native plants
  • July 1999 – February 2000: MWPC participates with Clackamas County in Aggregate Resources Task Force which evaluated economics of quarrying Madrone Wall, study results were inconclusive
  • May 2000: MWPC and Clackamas County jointly fund ECO Northwest economic quarry study which determines that it is uneconomical even under the most favorable circumstances to quarry this site
  • September 2000: Board of County Commissioners accept ECO Northwest study findings and drops mining plans “using County forces”
  • 2001: County institutes successful competitive bid process, as recommended by ECO Northwest study, by which private quarries and transportation companies supply rock and transportation needs saving County thousands of dollars
  • January 2003: With public mining issue resolved, MWPC proposes the County re-open site to public access and continues seeking permanent protective status
  • August 2004: MWPC met with Commissioner Larry Sowa and County Council Jim Coleman to discuss public access and preservation status; Commissioner Sowa commits County resources to determine the future of the Madrone Wall “once and for all”
  • March 2005: Board of County Commissioners considers reopening Madrone Wall as a park
  • 2005: Real Estate Appraisal Report (Hanna, McEldowney & Associates; this study lead Board of County Commissioners to not sell the site as a private quarry or trophy home housing development)
  • 2005: MWPC participated in Natural Resource Technical Team which helped create Damascus-Boring Concept Plan (70% of local citizens overwhelmingly supported “the idea of a big park located on the bluffs” of the Clackamas River)
  • January 2006: Oregon Public Broadcasting (OPB) radio site visit and news feature on Madrone Wall site with MWPC
  • January 2006: Board of County Commissioners unanimously accepts the Clackamas County Parks Advisory Board (PAB) recommendation that the Hardscrabble property (a.k.a. Madrone Wall) become part of an area for Clackamas River Watershed Protection and that it should not be sold to a private interest or mined.
  • November 2006: Metro bond measure passes by wide margin and identifies lower Clackamas River bluffs as a Tier I target area to create an “East Side Big Park” in a rapidly developing portion of Clackamas County as an important link to the lower Clackamas River and within short distance of developing communities of Damascus and Happy Valley.
  • 2008: MWPC conducts Heritage Tree Studies for Pacific Madrone and old-growth Douglas Fir trees and submits to Clackamas County
  • 2008 – 2010: MWPC provides heavily attended wildflower viewing tours to site
  • 2008: Bat Survey completed (Mark Perkins, Researcher; no threatened bat species)
  • 2008: Park Master Planning Process by Clackamas County incorporates input from multiple public meetings involving hundreds of local County citizens
  • October 2008: KGW/Channel 8 news site visit and news feature on Madrone Wall site with MWPC
  • October 2008: Blue Dot Group completes Site Boundary Survey Study
  • January 2009: Final Park Master Concept Plan finalized
  • October 2009: Metro acquired 88 acres of adjacent Tier I greenspace property from private citizen; County’s publicly-owned Madrone Wall site provides anchor for future East Side Big Park
  • 2008-2010 : Volunteer Restoration Events (rubbish removal, trail building, 800 hours of donated time at the site itself for site improvement)
  • 2009: Clackamas County liability review determined that County can allow rock climbing; rock climbing allowed on single days only during volunteer restoration events at site
  • 2009: Submission of Madrone Wall park creation project to resurface existing access road and create parking at site is made to Local Government Grant Program at Oregon Parks and Recreation Department (not funded)
  • 2009: MWPC visited site with soldiers from Oregon National Guard, 1249th Engineering Battalion and jointly submitted (Clackamas County and MWPC) application made for public-public partnership project between Guard and Clackamas County to train soldiers on road building equipment for park creation effort (as no engineering documents were in place, partnership did not move forward)
  • October 2009: Public Hearing at Clackamas County established conditional use requirements for park
  • September 2009: Site Distance Survey for State Highway Approach, Oregon Department of Transportation
  • 2010-2013: T.Y. Lin International professional civil engineer construction engineering documents created (firm created documents on a pro bono basis as a MWPC contact, documents are at 90% completion and complete all conditional use requirements)
  • January 2010: Wetland Study, Department of State Lands, State of Oregon
  • June 2010: Board of County Commissioners declared the Hardscrabble Quarry as Madrone Wall Park and additionally removed it from an inventory of future logging activity.
  • Summer 2010: Peregrine falcon study (Steve Berliner) at site as birds nest at site for first time seasonally from early Spring through late June/early July. Seasonal access closure may be a part of a future Madrone Wall Park plan which has effectively worked at many other sites nationally.
  • September 2010: Archaeological Study, State Historic Preservation Office, State of Oregon (“no significant cultural resources were noted” and “the (park) project will have no effect on any known cultural resources”)
  • 2011: Clackamas County Department of Transportation and Development reviewed T.Y. Lin International engineering construction documents
  • 2011: Clackamas County Parks completes Wildfire Management and Fuel Reduction Plan with MWPC and citizen input
  • 2012: Fuel reduction work completed at site by Clackamas County Parks
  • August 2013: Clackamas County Parks removed $64K provisionally allocated funding from Metro Greenspace Bond Measure from Madrone Wall park creation project for Springwater Corridor to plug cost overruns. Discussions of restoring a financial plan for moving Madrone Wall park creation project not forthcoming as of January 2015.
  • September 2013: Clackamas County Parks Manager stipulates a Memorandum Of Understanding be established between MWPC and County Parks as a part of moving process forward; MWPC welcomes this as a step forward
  • May 2014: MOU draft created by MWPC and submitted to Clackamas County Parks; no feedback as of January 2015.
  • January 2015: Madrone Wall is still closed after 18 years but it potentially could be opened as a park in a maximum of one or two years.